Anya Gallaccio Best Books and Series:

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Birth Date: 1963
Birth Place: Paisley
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Sex: female
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Nomitations: Turner Prize
Birth date: 1963
Birth place: Paisley
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Father: George Gallaccio
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All languages: | English |
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Member of: Young British Artists
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Movements: | contemporary art |
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Copyright: works protected by copyrights
Citizenship: | Scotland |
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Education: | Goldsmiths, University of London | | Kingston University |
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Occupation: | artist | | installation artist | | conceptual artist | | drawer |
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Anya Gallaccio Biography and Interesting Facts

Anya Gallaccio (born 1963) is a British artist, who creates site-specific, minimalist installations and often works with organic matter (including chocolate, sugar, flowers and ice). Her use of organic materials results in natural processes of transformation and decay, meaning that Gallaccio is unable to predict the end result of her installations. Something which at the start of an exhibition may be pleasurable, such as the scent of flowers or chocolate, would inevitably become increasingly unpleasant over time. The timely and site-specific nature of her work make it notoriously difficult to document. Her work therefore challenges the traditional notion that an art object or sculpture should essentially be a monument within a museum or gallery. Instead her work often lives through the memory of those that saw and experienced it - or the concept of the artwork itself.

Early life

Born in Paisley, Scotland to TV producer George Gallaccio and actress Maureen Morris. She grew up in south west London, England and studied at Kingston Polytechnic (1984–85) and Goldsmiths College (1985–88). In 1988 Gallaccio exhibited in the Damien Hirst-curated Freeze exhibition, and in 1990 the Henry Bond and Sarah Lucas organised East Country Yard shows, which brought together many of the Young British Artists. Gallaccio is a Professor in the Department of Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD).

Art practice

Much of her work uses organic materials, with fruit, vegetables and flowers all featuring in her work. Sometimes these materials undergo a change during the course of being exhibited. In Red on Green (1992), ten thousand rose heads placed on a bed of their stalks gradually withered as the exhibition went on. For Intensities and Surfaces (1996) Gallaccio left a thirty two ton block of ice with a salt core in the disused pump station at Wapping and allowed it to melt.In a 2018 interview with Ocula Magazine, Gallaccio remarked of the YBA breakout exhibition Freeze "It feels just as precarious now as it did then. And I think it is good to constantly remind myself of that and not to get complacent. The bravado and the chutzpah of Freeze was impressive; it was more about a kind of attitude and that is something that has had reverberations."She sometimes re-creates works. Her most well-known work Red on Green was originally made for her first solo showing in a public gallery, at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London in 1992. It was then recreated ten years later for the exhibition Blast to Freeze: British Art in the 20th Century mounted by Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg in 2002 - 2003 and for the 2004 British Council exhibition Turning Points: 20th Century British Sculpture.In Stoke 2004, Gallaccio coated an old farm building at Edinburgh's Jupiter Artland with almost 90 pounds of 70 percent cocoa, confectioner-quality chocolate. The work invited visitors to lick, touch, and stroke the walls.preserve ‘beauty’ 1991 - 2003 was an a ... Read full biography