The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets

Categories: | Television | | Popular Culture |
The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets
Author: Simon Singh
Rating: 3.88
Bestsellers Rate: 25029
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Book Format: Paperback
Binding: None
Pages: 272
Hours of reading: 4.5 hours
Publication Date: 2021
Languages: | English |
Price: 11,67 €

About the book

You may have watched hundreds of episodes of The Simpsons (and its sister show Futurama) without ever realising that they contain enough maths to form an entire university course. In The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets, Simon Singh explains how the brilliant writers, some of the mathematicians, have smuggled in mathematical jokes throughout the cartoon's twenty-five year history, exploring everything from to Mersenne primes, from Euler's equation to the unsolved riddle of P vs. NP, from perfect numbers to narcissistic numbers, and much more. With wit, clarity and a true fan's zeal, Singh analyses such memorable episodes as 'Bart the Genius' and 'Homer(3)' to offer an entirely new insight into the most successful show in television history.

Reviews

Singh blows the lid off a decades-long conspiracy to secretly educate cartoon viewers David X Cohen, writer for The Simpsons and Futurama

Quotes

Singh blows the lid off a decades-long conspiracy to secretly educate cartoon viewers -- David X Cohen, writer for The Simpsons and Futurama An entertaining picture of the insanely high-minded nature of the Simpsons' writers * Sunday Times * Singh shows a knack for gliding seamlessly between abstract mathematical concepts and every day life, always seeking out the most engaging, human and topical examples. Singh's clean prose, detailed research and enthusiasm for the world of numbers are likely to captivate even those for whom maths normally creates feelings of anxiety rather than mirth * The Times * A valuable, entertaining book that, above all, celebrates a supremely funny, sophisticated show * Financial Times * What have Homer and Bart got to do with Euler's equation, the googolplex or the topology of doughnuts? ... Simon Singh has fun weaving great mathematics stories around our favourite TV characters * New Scientist * Singh shows just how addictive maths can be * BBC Focus *

Simon Singh Biography

Simon Lehna Singh, (born 19 September 1964) is a British popular science author, theoretical and particle physicist. His written works include Fermat's Last Theorem (in the United States titled Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem), The Code Book (about cryptography and its history), Big Bang (about the Big Bang theory and the origins of the universe), Trick or Treatment? Alternative Medicine on Trial (about complementary and alternative medicine, co-written by Edzard Ernst) and The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets (about mathematical ideas and theorems hidden in episodes of The Simpsons and Futurama). In 2012 Singh founded the Good Thinking Society, through which he created the website "Parallel" to help students learn mathematics. Singh has also produced documentaries and works for television to accompany his books, is a trustee of the National Museum of Science and Industry, a patron of Humanists UK, founder of the Good Thinking Society, and co-founder of the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme.

Early life and education

Singh's parents emigrated from Punjab, India to Britain in 1950. He is the youngest of three brothers, his eldest brother being Tom Singh, the founder of the UK New Look chain of stores. Singh grew up in Wellington, Somerset, attending Wellington School, and went on to Imperial College London, where he studied physics. He was active in the student union, becoming President of the Royal College of Science Union. Later he completed a PhD in particle physics at the University of Cambridge as a postgraduate student of Emmanuel College, Cambridge while working at CERN, Geneva.

Career

In 1983, he was part of the UA2 experiment in CERN. In 1987, Singh taught science at The Doon School, an independent all-boys' boarding school in India. In 1990 Singh returned to England and joined the BBC's Science and Features Department, where he was a producer and director working on programmes such as Tomorrow's World and Horizon. Singh was introduced to Richard Wiseman through their collaboration on Tomorrow's World. At Wiseman's suggestion, Singh directed a segment about politicians lying in different mediums, and getting the public's opinion on whether the person was lying or not. After attending some of Wiseman's lectures, Singh came up with the idea to create a show together, and Theatre of Science was born. It was a way to deliver science to normal people in an entertaining manner. Richard Wiseman has influenced Singh in such a way that Singh states: My writing initially was about pure science but a lot of my research now has been inspired by his desire to debunk things such as the paranormal – we both hate psychics, mediums, pseudoscience in general. Singh directed his BAFTA award-winning documentary about the world's most notorious mathematical problem entitled Fermat's Last Theorem in 1996. The film was memorable for its opening shot of a middle-aged mathematician ... Read full biography

Authors: Simon Singh
Editors:
Translators:
Illustrators:
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Imprint:
Languages: | English |
Original Language:
ISBN13: 9781408842812
ISBN10: 1408842815
Series:
Reference Edition:
Edition: None
Edition Statement: None
Illustrations: 20 b/w throughout
Literature Country: None
Literature Period: None
Book Format: Paperback
Book Binding: None
Paper: None
Font: None
Pages: 272
Book Weight: 196
Book Dimensions: 129x198x20
Circulation: None
Publication date: Oct. 9, 2014
First Publication Date: None
Publication City/Country: London, United Kingdom

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