Wrongteous

Categories: | Art History | | Art Books |
Wrongteous
Author: Graham Greene Helen Simpson Paul Rooney Leo Fitzmaurice
Rating: 5.00
Bestsellers Rate: 2295347
Publisher: Art Editions North
Book Format: Hardback
Binding: None
Pages: 160
Hours of reading: 2.7 hours
Publication Date: 2021
Languages: | English |
Price: 10,97 €

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Graham Greene Biography

Henry Graham Greene (2 October 1904 – 3 April 1991) was an English writer and journalist regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer, both of serious Catholic novels, and of thrillers (or "entertainments" as he termed them). He was shortlisted, in 1966 and 1967, for the Nobel Prize for Literature. Through 67 years of writing, which included over 25 novels, he explored the conflicting moral and political issues of the modern world. He was awarded the 1968 Shakespeare Prize and the 1981 Jerusalem Prize. He converted to Catholicism in 1926 after meeting his future wife, Vivien Dayrell-Browning. Later in life he took to calling himself a "Catholic agnostic". He died in 1991, at age 86, of leukemia, and was buried in Corseaux cemetery.

Early years (1904–1922)

Henry Graham Greene was born in 1904 in St John's House, a boarding house of Berkhamsted School, Hertfordshire, where his father was house master. He was the fourth of six children; his younger brother, Hugh, became Director-General of the BBC, and his elder brother, Raymond, an eminent physician and mountaineer. His parents, Charles Henry Greene and Marion Raymond Greene, were first cousins, both members of a large, influential family that included the owners of Greene King Brewery, bankers, and statesmen; his mother was cousin to Robert Louis Stevenson. Charles Greene was second master at Berkhamsted School, where the headmaster was Dr Thomas Fry, who was married to Charles' cousin. Another cousin was the right-wing pacifist Ben Greene, whose politics led to his internment during World War II. In his childhood, Greene spent his summers with his uncle, Sir Graham Greene, at Harston House in Cambridgeshire. In Greene's description of his childhood, he describes his learning to read there: "It was at Harston I found quite suddenly I could read—the book was Dixon Brett, Detective. I didn't want anyone to know of my discovery, so I read only in secret, in a remote attic, but my mother must have spotted what I was at all the same, for she gave me Ballantyne's The Coral Island for the train journey home—always an interminable journey with the long wait between trains at Bletchley…" In 1910, Charles Greene succeeded Dr Fry as headmaster of Berkhamsted. Graham also attended the school as a boarder. Bullied and profoundly depressed, he made several suicide attempts, including, as he wrote in his autobiography, by Russian roulette and by taking aspirin before going swimming in the school pool. In 1920, aged 16, in what was a radical step for the time, he was sent for psychoanalysis for six months in London, afterwards returning to school as a day student. School friends included Claud Cockburn the journalist, and Peter Quennell the historian. Greene contributed several stories to the school magazine, one of which was published by a Londo ... Read full biography

Authors: Graham Greene Helen Simpson Paul Rooney Leo Fitzmaurice
Editors:
Translators:
Illustrators:
Publisher: Art Editions North
Imprint:
Languages: | English |
Original Language:
ISBN13: 9780955747823
ISBN10: 0955747821
Series:
Reference Edition:
Edition: None
Edition Statement: None
Illustrations: 48 colour illustrations
Literature Country: None
Literature Period: None
Book Format: Hardback
Book Binding: None
Paper: None
Font: None
Pages: 160
Book Weight: 190
Book Dimensions: 95x145
Circulation: None
Publication date: Nov. 7, 2008
First Publication Date: None
Publication City/Country: Sunderland, United Kingdom

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