The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes

The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes
Author: Monocle
Rating: 4.18
Bestsellers Rate: 14618
Publisher: Die Gestalten Verlag
Book Format: Hardback
Binding: Твердый
Pages: 400
Hours of reading: 6.7 hours
Publication Date: 2021
Languages: | English |
Price: 43,69 €

About the book

This Monocle book tells us how to turn a house into a home. Both a practical guide and a great source of inspiration, The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes presents the interiors, furniture, and locations you need to know about along with portraits of the people who can make it happen. The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes celebrates the durable and the meaningful through a collection of homes that tell a story. Most architecture and interior books show houses polished to perfection, manicured to the extent that it is hard to imagine anybody acually lives there: they seem to miss the point that homes are meant to be inhabited. They should be able to take the scuffs and knocks and to be part of a community, whether in a Chicago skyscraper or on Australia's sunshine coast. So where are the best places to make a home? What are the villages, coastlines, mountains, towns, and cities that would make you want to settle down? The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes answers those questions with a global photographic survey of a wide variety of homes. Whether the focus is on a remote residence in the Swedish archipelago or a lush abode in Rio de Janeiro, or on the difference between residing in Tokyo and Toronto, this book is the perfect balance between the inspirational and the practical. The book is a survey of everything you need to know to build the residence of your dreams, providing insight into the best neighborhoods, architects, and makers all over the world. From design-store owners to green-roof gardeners, The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes introduces you to interesting people with ideas that are built to last. Monocle's signature illustrations punctuate the book's rich and detailed content. Through striking photography, The Monocle Guide to Cosy Homes also gives you a glimpse into the lives that unfold in these apartments, villas, and cottages, showing that these homes are alive and that this is precisely what makes them special. This is a book that should be referred to again and again--it is a book about the quality of life.

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Monocle Biography

A monocle is a type of corrective lens used to correct or enhance the visual perception in only one eye. It consists of a circular lens, generally with a wire ring around the circumference that can be attached to a string or wire. The other end of the string is then connected to the wearer's clothing to avoid losing the monocle. The antiquarian Philipp von Stosch wore a monocle in Rome in the 1720s, in order to closely examine engravings and antique engraved gems, but the monocle did not become an article of gentlemen's apparel until the 19th century. It was introduced by the dandy's quizzing glass of the 1790s, as an article of high fashion.

Styles

There are three additional styles of monocle. The first style consists of a simple loop of metal with a lens which was slotted into the eye orbit. These were the first monocles worn in England and could be found from the 1830s onwards. The second style, which was developed in the 1890s, was the most elaborate, consisting of a frame with a raised edge-like extension known as the gallery. The gallery was designed to help secure the monocle in place by raising it out of the eye's orbit slightly, so that the eyelashes would not jar it. Monocles with galleries were often the most expensive. The wealthy would have the frames custom-made to fit their eye sockets. A sub-category of the galleried monocle was the "sprung gallery", where the gallery was replaced by an incomplete circle of flattened, ridged wire supported by three posts. The ends were pulled together, the monocle was placed in the eye orbit, and the ends released, causing the gallery to spring out and keep the monocle in place. The third style of monocle was frameless. This consisted of a cut piece of glass, with a serrated edge to provide a grip and sometimes a hole drilled into one side for a cord. Often the frameless monocle had no cord and would be worn freely. This style was popular at the beginning of the 20th century as the lens could be cut to fit any shape eye orbit inexpensively, without the cost of a customized frame. Wearing a monocle is generally not uncomfortable. If customised, monocles could be worn securely with little effort. However, periodic adjustment is common for monocle wearers to keep the monocle from popping, as can be seen in films featuring Erich von Stroheim. Often only the rich could afford to have a monocle custom-fabricated, while the poor had to settle for ill-fitting monocles that were less comfortable and less secure. The popular perception was (and still is) that a monocle could easily fall off with the wrong facial expression. This is true to an extent, for example raising the eyebrow too far will allow the monocle to fall. A once-standard comedic device exploits this: an upper-class gentleman affects a shocked expression in response to some event, and his monocle falls into his drink, or smashes to pieces on the floor, etc. Abraham Lincoln was not known to wear a monocle, although it has also bee ... Read full biography

Authors: Monocle
Editors:
Translators:
Illustrators:
Publisher: Die Gestalten Verlag
Imprint: Gestalten
Languages: | English |
Original Language:
ISBN13: 9783899555608
ISBN10: 3899555600
Series:
Reference Edition:
Edition: None
Edition Statement: 3. Aufl.
Illustrations: w. ill.
Literature Country: None
Literature Period: None
Book Format: Hardback
Book Binding: Твердый
Paper: None
Font: None
Pages: 400
Book Weight: 1678.29
Book Dimensions: 200x265x33.02
Circulation: None
Publication date: Sept. 1, 2015
First Publication Date: None
Publication City/Country: Berlin, Germany

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